Restaurateurs

Best Chinese restaurants in Charlotte, recommended by foodies, restaurateurs and readers

We suspect you usually end up eating most of your Chinese food after a Google search for “nearest Chinese restaurant to me” in Charlotte, and there’s nothing wrong with that. But sometimes you’re in the mood to step out of that comfort zone and try something beyond your standard Sesame Chicken order.

To help you out, we dug around in our archives and asked our foodie friends, a few restaurant experts and CharlotteFive readers for recommendations. What we came up with are a few restaurants that offer a more authentic taste of Chinese flavors and fun dishes you probably won’t

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Restaurateurs discuss criticism of Hot Crispy Oil and culinary appropriation

When John Trimble launched Hot Crispy Oil last year, he did not anticipate the condiment would make a splash in all the ways it did.

After the Times Union published a story in July on Hot Crispy Oil and Trimble’s turn from closing La Serre, his family’s 43-year-old French restaurant in downtown Albany, to starting a condiment business, sales for Hot Crispy Oil soared. The blend of oil with spices and hot peppers has sold 50,000 jars since its launch last summer.

Criticism that Trimble, a white man, was stealing ideas from Chinese culture rose, too. A letter to

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A Chat With Food Critics, Chefs And Restaurateurs From Asia

I gather my friends – Asian food writers, food critics, restaurateurs and chefs – asking them why they think Chinese food comes with such a bad reputation – ultimately being the poster child of ‘dirty’.

With hundreds of Chinese restaurants closed in this pandemic year, perhaps it is more timely than ever to ask the question – can Chinese food ever be seen as ‘fine-dining’ and will America lose its love/hate relationship with Chinese food with all these closures?

Let’s not forget Chinese-American cuisine is very

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How Montreal’s Chinese Restaurateurs Are Planning Takeout Feasts for a Less Than Ideal Lunar New Year

At this time of year, the sights and sounds of the raucous lion dance, a Chinese tradition believed to bring good fortune and banish evil, would usually be delighting visitors to Chinatown’s streets. But COVID-19 and its resulting curfew have put a damper on Chinese New Year, also known as Lunar New Year or Spring Festival, which falls on February 12. While festive red is still de rigueur for the lunar holiday, getting together in large groups, at home or in restaurants, is simply not possible, leaving many with little to look forward to, other than the food, to celebrate

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