A creative approach might help your product taste better

As consumers, we’re besieged with puffery. Brands shout at us, boasting they have New York’s

As consumers, we’re besieged with puffery.

Brands shout at us, boasting they have New York’s No. 1 pizza, the world’s best coffee, America’s favorite car, or the best blue jeans in the universe.

But these hollow claims fall flat with our exceptionally well-developed BS detectors.

In sharp contrast, one creative restaurateur took the opposite approach.

The owner of Aunt Dai’s Chinese Restaurant in Montreal prefers a more brutally honest approach. Listed next to each item on the menu are “owner’s comments,” serving up transparency that will make you chuckle. Here are some of my favorites:

Sweet and Spicy Pork Strips: “I am not a huge fan of our version of this dish, to be honest.”

Orange Beef: “Comparing to our General Tao Chicken, this one is not that good.”

Black Pepper Chicken: “Don’t let the name fool you, this one is NOT authentic Chinese food. True story, one customer got really mad because it’s not so Chinese.”